17August

With a Jewish Voice: Step 9

With a Jewish Voice: Step 9


Step 9: “Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.”

“The deed is more important than the thought; who we are is equal to what we do. Wonderful thoughts do not repair the world; small deeds begin to do so.” Rabbi Kerry Olitzky

At the start of getting sober, a lot of us are tempted to go on an ‘apology tour’ to reach out to anyone and everyone with an open ear. It felt so good to say, “I’m sorry.” If a little is good, then a lot would be great. Who cares what the apology is for; what’s important is that they hear, "I’m sorry.” Don’t you just love how an addict thinks?

Well, that isn’t enough. Chances are you were sorry long before now. It doesn’t do anyone any good if you apologize when you have no idea why (or even if you have some idea). For the apology to have meaning, you must work it through a few steps. It’s best to take a little time. Each one in its own time. And the ‘promises’ will begin to come true.

Written by Eric Miller, Posted in Counseling Services

About the Author

Eric Miller

Eric Miller

In recovery since 2008, Eric has a great deal of knowledge about substance abuse. He couples his experience with his observant Jewish upbringing to offer a Jewish lens to the issues of addiction and sobriety.