12April

10 Ways Adults Can Help Prevent Bullying

10 Ways Adults Can Help Prevent Bullying


On Sunday, April 15, Atlanta Council BBYO is partnering with The Bully Project for a screening of the film BULLY, which depicts a “year in the life” of North America’s Bullying crisis. The film is showing at 2pm at the Landmark Midtown Art Theater. It is recommended to get tickets in advance.

Following the film, Rebecca Stapel-Wax, director of The Rainbow Center, a program of Jewish Family & Career Services (JF&CS), will facilitate a discussion.  JF&CS, through both The Rainbow Center and the Child & Adolescent Services – Tools for Families division, offers a wealth of resources dedicated to preventing bullying, supporting victims and helping heal the wounds. Below are 10 ways parents can help prevent bullying and protect our kids.

  • 1.    Learn as much as you can about bullying among children and youth.
  • 2.    Talk with children in your family about bullying and your expectations about their behavior.
  • 3.    Report bullying that your children experience or that you witness.
  • 4.    Remember that actions sometimes speak louder than words. Be sure that you treat others in a respectful way and that you don't inadvertently model bullying behavior yourself.
  • 5.    Be watchful for possible signs of bullying among children in your family. Talking openly with children and youth in your home is important, but often children are reluctant to talk with adults about bullying that they've experienced or taken part in. Be watchful for behaviors and other signs that your child might be involved in bullying. Know the warning signs and take immediate action if you suspect bullying.
  • 6.    If you suspect that a child in your family is being bullied, respond and figure out the possible next steps to take.
  • 7.    If you suspect that a child in your family is the victim of electronic or online bullying, review information on cyber bullying.
  • 8.    If you think a child in your family has bullied (or is continuing to bully) siblings or peers, know the warning signs and take immediate action if you suspect bullying.
  • 9.    If your child has been a witness or bystander to bullying, find out more about the bullying incident. Discuss with your child how they can help another child who is bullied. Depending on where the bullying took place and its severity, report the bullying school authorities, parents, or other adults in charge.
  • 10.    Work with school personnel and other adults in your community to prevent and reduce bullying.  All adults in a community have a responsibility to help keep kids safe and stop bullying among children and youth.

For additional information on JF&CS resources related to anti-bullying and support, please contact us at 770.677.9474.

Written by Rebecca Stapel-Wax, Posted in JF&CS - Hope and Opportunity Happen Here, Child & Adolescent Services, Counseling Services

About the Author

Rebecca Stapel-Wax

Rebecca Stapel-Wax

Rebecca Stapel-Wax is the Director of The Rainbow Center, a program serving the needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered (GLBTQ), those questioning their sexual orientation and gender, their families and friends.